Environmental Degradation

‘One Of The First Conditions Of Happiness Is That The Link Between Man And Nature Shall Not Be Broken’.

Environmental degradation has become a “common concern” for humankind over the past few decades.

The distinctive nature of the present environmental problems is that they are caused more by environmental pollution and pollutants originating in human activity than natural phenomena.  

Environmental degradation is the disintegration of the earth or deterioration of the environment through the consumption of assets, like, air, water, and soil. The destruction of environments and the eradication of wildlife. Air pollution, water pollution, garbage, and pollution of the natural environment are all challenges for India.
 According to World Bank experts, between 1995 through 2010, India has made one of the fastest progress in the world, in addressing its environmental issues and improving its environmental quality. Still, India has a long way to go to reach environmental quality similar to those enjoyed in developed economies. Pollution remains a major challenge and opportunity for India.
 Environmental degradation is one of the primary cause of diseases, health issues, and long term livelihood impacts for India. 
 The major causes of environmental degradation are modern urbanization, industrialization, over-population growth, deforestation, etc.
 Environmental pollution refers to the degradation of the quality and quantity of natural resources.
The smoke radiated by the vehicles and processing plants expands the measure of toxic gases noticeable all around. The waste items, smoke radiated by vehicles, and ventures are the fundamental driver of contamination. 
Spontaneous urbanization and industrialization have caused water, air, and sound contamination.
 Urbanization and industrialization help to expand the contamination of the wellsprings of water. Neediness still remains an issue at the base of a few ecological issues. 
 
 There are very adverse effects of environmental degradation. 
The greatest effects on the health of individuals and populations result from environmental degradation. Human health might be at the receiving end as a result of environmental degradation. Areas exposed to toxic air pollutants can cause respiratory problems like pneumonia and asthma.
 Millions of people are known to have died due to the indirect effects of air pollution. Air pollution in Indian cities is among the most polluted in the world. The air in metropolitan cities has become highly polluted and pollutant concentrations exceed limit considered safe by the World Health Organization (WHO).
Urban air pollution has grown across India in the last decade is alarming. Some of the most important air pollutants are residual suspended particulate matter (RSPM), suspended particulate matter (SPM), nitrogen dioxides (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), lead, sulfur dioxide (SO2), etc. The main factors account for urban air quality deterioration are growing industrialization and increasing vehicular pollution, industrial emissions, automobile exhaust and the burning of fossil fuels kills thousands and lives many more to suffer mainly from respiratory damage, heart, and lung diseases. 
Indoor air pollution may pose an even greater hazard for human health. Cooking and heating with wood, crop residues, animal dung, and low-quality coal produce smoke that contains dangerous particles and gases. When fuels such as these are burned indoors, using inefficient stoves and poor ventilation, they can cause tuberculosis, other serious respiratory diseases, and blindness.
In fact, indoor air pollution from cooking and heating with unsafe fuels has been designated by the World Bank as one of the four most critical environmental problems in developing countries.  
 
  The primary causes of environmental degradation in India are attributed to the rapid growth of population in combination with economic development and over use of natural resources.
 Major environmental calamities in India include land degradation, deforestation, soil erosion, habitat destruction and loss of biodiversity. 
Economic growth and changing consumption patterns have led to a rising demand for energy and increasing transport activities. Air, water and noise pollution together with water scarcity dominate the environmental issues in India.
 According to World Bank estimate, between 1995 through 2010, India has made one of the fastest progresses in the world, in addressing its environmental issues and improving its environmental quality. 
Still, India has a long way to go to reach environmental quality similar to those enjoyed in developed economies.   

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